Partisan Gerrymandering

By Rob Tyson In Wisconsin, a challenge to the State’s drawing of its legislative districts based on partisan gerrymandering is moving toward a trial beginning May 24.  The Plaintiffs, generally linked together as Democrats, have challenged the legislative districts drawn by “Republican legislators to maximize Republican wins and minimize Democratic influence over the political process…”  […]

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When Are Flawed Elections Voidable?

When are election irregularities so substantial as to void election results? That was the question before the Kentucky Court of Appeals in Adair County Board of Elections v. Arnold, No. 2015-CA-000661-MR, 2015 WL 5308132 (Ky. App. 2015). In Adair, Ben Arnold, an unsuccessful write-in candidate for mayor, and two voters, brought suit against the Adair […]

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The Ballot Selfie

Earlier this month, a federal court in New Hampshire struck down a 2014 enacted New Hampshire law that prohibited voters from taking and disclosing photographs of their completed ballots to let others know how they voted. The law was challenged on the grounds it infringed upon the plaintiffs’ First Amendment rights.  The Judge agreed and […]

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I Learned Something Today

Earlier this week, my “Word for the Day” was psephology.  Dictionary.com frequently posts a word in its Word for the Day, and this is one that I am not familiar. However, psephology is a word that I figured I might have seen somewhere, but I cannot make such a statement with certainty.  It is a […]

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The Meaning of “One Person, One Vote” to be Decided by the Supreme Court (Finally)

Attached is an interesting blog post by Lyle Denniston[1] about two redistricting cases the United States Supreme Court will hear in its Fall Term.[2] One case, arising out of Texas, will answer what population measure should be used—total population, total citizen voting age, total registered voters in a state—to ensure “one person, one vote” principle […]

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